Frying, Drying and Making Tidbits From My Andhran Kitchen by Paradesi Bhaarya

Drying chillis in a mixture of buttermilk and corriander leaf fresh, lots of salt for several days in an earthen jar. Remove when white and put on trys in sun all day until dry. Store in a very dry place for up to 3 years if use silicon packets in container, just make sure it doesnt touch edibles. We use chillis from Guntur District in Andhra Pradesh and they are so delicious!

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Fryums are a common addition to a meal to add toast texture to dals. First we prepare a thick paste and then take old saree material and lay out flat using rocks to hold down edges. Then, we spoon on dollops of paste to saree and let dry in sun. Remove at night and then lay out again next morning until completely sun dried, about 1 week. If cracking too much the paste was not thick enough.
Pastes can be made with anytuing from chickpea flour to rice flour. Many fvorites are potato flour and tapioca flour. You will want to take 1 liter of water and bring to a boil add ground green chillis, and 4 Tablespoons of whole cumin seed and 5 to 10 tablespoons of salt. Fryums are usually very salty, so salt to taste. Once boiling add flour of choice (rice, corn, jowar, millet or ragi, besan or potato flour) Bring mixture to a boil and watch it thicken. you want it to be thick like molassas but still runny. Finish by putting on saree and setting out in sun. Do not turn or mess with them. As you see below we have put a plastic cover over them that is transparent, we do this only to keep flys or dirt from landing on them, as India is very dusty.

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To make Fryums we heat up 5 tbs oil for several minutes, then we place a few of them in oil and jiggle a little, once puffy flip and repeat. should only take 1 minute for them to fry up. Serve with dal and a vegetable curry! Enjoy!

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Frying, Drying and Making Tidbits From My Andhran Kitchen by Paradesi Bhaarya

Drying chillis in a mixture of buttermilk and corriander leaf fresh, lots of salt for several days in an earthen jar. Remove when white and put on trys in sun all day until dry. Store in a very dry place for up to 3 years if use silicon packets in container, just make sure it doesnt touch edibles. We use chillis from Guntur District in Andhra Pradesh and they are so delicious!

image

image

Fryums are a common addition to a meal to add toast texture to dals. First we prepare a thick paste and then take old saree material and lay out flat using rocks to hold down edges. Then, we spoon on dollops of paste to saree and let dry in sun. Remove at night and then lay out again next morning until completely sun dried, about 1 week. If cracking too much the paste was not thick enough.
Pastes can be made with anytuing from chickpea flour to rice flour. Many fvorites are potato flour and tapioca flour. You will want to take 1 liter of water and bring to a boil add ground green chillis, and 4 Tablespoons of whole cumin seed and 5 to 10 tablespoons of salt. Fryums are usually very salty, so salt to taste. Once boiling add flour of choice (rice, corn, jowar, millet or ragi, besan or potato flour) Bring mixture to a boil and watch it thicken. you want it to be thick like molassas but still runny. Finish by putting on saree and setting out in sun. Do not turn or mess with them. As you see below we have put a plastic cover over them that is transparent, we do this only to keep flys or dirt from landing on them, as India is very dusty.

image

image

To make Fryums we heat up 5 tbs oil for several minutes, then we place a few of them in oil and jiggle a little, once puffy flip and repeat. should only take 1 minute for them to fry up. Serve with dal and a vegetable curry! Enjoy!

Thotakota Fry/ Amaranth Leaves Fry

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I have enjoyed amaranth since I started eating them in 2011 when my Mother-In-Law brought them back from a trip to her home village in Seesilee, Andhra Pradesh, India. They were fresh and organically grown at her parent’s farm in the middle of the “rice bowl”. So, I usually post photos of my recipes made but I am currently missing my camera’s memory card. The above photo is from Google Images and it is of amaranth leaves. I encourage all who eat this to use a bit more oil than normally would use in leaves to impart the flavor when cooked. You can use amaranth leaves in salads raw as well. This recipe is my Mother-In-Laws and she is a Telugu lady who really enjoys hot food (karaam), but adjusted this recipe for me. I hope you enjoy and make amaranth leaves apart of your weekly diet!

Amaranth is also enjoyed by the Greeks and they have several recipes. I have not tried any, but someday when I get to make some homemade goat cheese and make a Greek amaranth fry, I will certainly post it!

4-5 bushels of amaranth leaves trimmed and chopped

1/2 onion chopped

1 sliced and chopped green chili pepper

1/4 tsp turmeric powder

1 diced tomato

3 Tbs of oil- I prefer Olive Oil or Sesame Oil

4 Curry Leaves

2 garlic cloves pressed and pealed

1/2 Tsp of salt- to taste

In a wok heat oil and add garlic for 25 seconds then onion and green chili pepper and fry for 1 min. Add turmeric, curry leaf and tomato and cook for 3-4 min. Add the amaranth leaves and stir ingredients together slowly, add salt. Cook until the greens are wilted yet a bright green color, about 5-6 minutes. Turn off stove, let sit for 1/2 hour and serve with Chapathi or Pulka.

The good: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin, and a very good source of Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc, Copper and Manganese.

Variations of this recipe I have found:

http://homemadetelugurecipes.blogspot.in/2011/02/thotakura-amaranth-leaves-fry.html

http://www.sailusfood.com/2010/01/20/thotakura-vepudu-amaranth-leaves-stir-fry-3/

 

Paneer and Spinach Crepe Filling

1 cup fresh paneer diced
3 cups spinach
1 cup Wild Mushrooms or Crimini Mushrooms sliced
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
2 tbs olive oil
12 Crepes

In a saucepan take oil and wilt the spinach adding salt and pepper 2 minutes into cooking. Take it off the grill and set aside. In pan take mushrooms and let cook dry and add a little pinch of salt. Set aside. Once spinach has cooled add mushrooms and paneer. Mix well and salt and pepper to taste. Now fill crapes and enjoy!

You can use feta in place of paneer. Mozzarella, too.

Quick Curd/Yogurt During Summer

Our Homemade Recipe for Curd/Yogurt

Ingredients:
1/4 tsp of plain yogurt pref Greek Yogurt if in USA
1 Liter of Whole Milk or Whole Fat Milk (can use organic milk and rBST free milk as we will pasteurize the milk prior to use)
1 container that holds approx 1 liter of fluid with a lid, preferably a metal container, plastic ok but not suggested. Can also use small clay pots if making in summertime/hot weather as it makes the curd sweeter.

Directions:
On Lowest heat, slowly bring milk to a boil. Once to a boil, boil for 15 minutes. Remove from heat. Place milk on a ring or hotpad and wait for milk to come down to room temperature. Once temp down, pour into the container and add to center of liquid the 1/4 tsp of yogurt. Cover and let sit at room temp for 6-8 hours (hard to do in cold weather so you can look up ways to keep a constant temp, don’t have time to go into that, can keep in a box, casserole warmer, warm oven but must be maintained at 95-115 deg) Marble floor can help cool down the milk faster to room temp.

Once it is done it will be solid like Jell-O and have wey water. You can continue to make buttermilk or more solid curd by using a cheese cloth. Otherwise, it is ready to eat sugary, salty or plain! We use it with all kinds of foods in India and its very low fat too!

Vankaya Egg Kura- Eggplant/Brinjal Egg Curry

My favorite vegetable is definitely the green round eggplant we find here in Andhra Pradesh. If you cook it just right you will get a creamy light artichoke like flavor from it. I prefer this curry when cooking for my family. How the vegetable and egg complement each other makes this dish mouth watering for even children.

Image8 Small Green Vankaya/Eggplant/Brinjal washed and cut in long strips

1 Onion washed and diced

4-5 Green Chili washed and diced

1/2 tsp Turmeric

1-2 TBS Red Chili Powder

4 TBS Oil

4 Washed and Diced Tomatoes

In a heavy bottom pan saute oil, green chili and onions for 3-4 min on low. Add tomatoes on high, with red chili powder, turmeric, Cook mixture until tomatoes are slightly mushy. Add 1 1/2 cup water, coat all the eggplant with the mixture and cook covered on low for 10 minutes.

During the wait cut slits into the sides of the eggs to soak up flavor of curry. Once 10 minutes is up uncover and stir. Add eggs like folding blueberries into pancakes. Cook on medium for another 10 minutes or until eggplant is cooked (skin not peeling from seedy inside) Serve with rice and curd,

 

 

Bengaladumpa Mutton (Potato and Lamb/Goat Curry) Andhra Style

I have looked high and low for this recipe online and have found nothing. This following recipe is from my kitchen and is not the way my Mother-in-Law prepares it. I have had to teach myself the art of Mutton (which is goat not lamb in my part of the world) preparation. So, this recipe is from what I have tasted from my journeys around Indian tasting their curries. This is a curry I suggest making for a nice group of people along with rice or chapatti. We also make the curry ahead of time and then add potatoes on the second day after the curry has cooled down and rested in refrigerator. The flavors really set in and adding some almost done potatoes to the curry makes it a warm second day meal!

1 1/2 kg Mutton with and without bones cleaned and defatted

1 Large Onion Diced

7-9 Green Chili Diced

3 Large Washed Red Ripe Tomatoes Diced

1 Large Bunch of Coriander/Cilantro/Chinese Parsley washed and set aside- do not chop until recipe calls for it as it must be at freshest point

2 Medium Dried Basil Leaf

1/2 tsp of Turmeric

6 Tbs of Oil of your choice

3 Tbs of Red Chili Powder

1 Tbs of Coriander Powder

1 inch strip of cinnamon bark in small pieces

5 whole cloves

3 Tbs of Fresh Garlic Ginger Paste

3 Tbs Salt

1 tsp of Pepper

1 tsp cumin powder-optional

1 tsp mustard seeds

In a separate bowl, combine mutton 1 tbs red chili powder, 1 tbs of salt, 2 tbs oil, turmeric powder, 1 tbs coriander powder, and garlic-ginger paste. mix with hands and let sit. Meanwhile, we will start on the base.

In a heavy bottom pan heat 4 tbs oil and then add mustard seed, clove and cinnamon and listen until it pops. Add in onion and green chili. Cook on low for 2-4 minutes depending on altitude. Add remaining red chili powder and bay leaf and tomatoes and 2 Tbs of water on medium. Cover and let tomatoes cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Now, add the bowl of mutton mixture and turn on high for 6 minutes. Add 3 cups of water and salt accordingly. Cover and boil stirring occasionally for 45min to 1 hour. the bone marrow to be cooked all the way through and until meat is not chewy or hard.

You can choose to eat this mutton curry as is or as instructed and cooled and placed into the refrigerator. The following morning wash and peel 6 potatoes and dice. Pressure cook the potatoes for 12 minutes (I don’t depend on number of whistles as each pressure cooker is different) take them out and put into the mutton curry on high with 1-2 cups of water and 1/2 Tbs salt. Cook for additional 15 minutes. Serve with Chapatti or Rice. (If you are American this “stew” would taste very good with mashed potatoes and corn on the cob. I usually make a small portion of mashed potatoes to eat it this way myself. Reminds me of my childhood in USA.