Frying, Drying and Making Tidbits From My Andhran Kitchen by Paradesi Bhaarya

Drying chillis in a mixture of buttermilk and corriander leaf fresh, lots of salt for several days in an earthen jar. Remove when white and put on trys in sun all day until dry. Store in a very dry place for up to 3 years if use silicon packets in container, just make sure it doesnt touch edibles. We use chillis from Guntur District in Andhra Pradesh and they are so delicious!

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Fryums are a common addition to a meal to add toast texture to dals. First we prepare a thick paste and then take old saree material and lay out flat using rocks to hold down edges. Then, we spoon on dollops of paste to saree and let dry in sun. Remove at night and then lay out again next morning until completely sun dried, about 1 week. If cracking too much the paste was not thick enough.
Pastes can be made with anytuing from chickpea flour to rice flour. Many fvorites are potato flour and tapioca flour. You will want to take 1 liter of water and bring to a boil add ground green chillis, and 4 Tablespoons of whole cumin seed and 5 to 10 tablespoons of salt. Fryums are usually very salty, so salt to taste. Once boiling add flour of choice (rice, corn, jowar, millet or ragi, besan or potato flour) Bring mixture to a boil and watch it thicken. you want it to be thick like molassas but still runny. Finish by putting on saree and setting out in sun. Do not turn or mess with them. As you see below we have put a plastic cover over them that is transparent, we do this only to keep flys or dirt from landing on them, as India is very dusty.

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To make Fryums we heat up 5 tbs oil for several minutes, then we place a few of them in oil and jiggle a little, once puffy flip and repeat. should only take 1 minute for them to fry up. Serve with dal and a vegetable curry! Enjoy!

Frying, Drying and Making Tidbits From My Andhran Kitchen by Paradesi Bhaarya

Drying chillis in a mixture of buttermilk and corriander leaf fresh, lots of salt for several days in an earthen jar. Remove when white and put on trys in sun all day until dry. Store in a very dry place for up to 3 years if use silicon packets in container, just make sure it doesnt touch edibles. We use chillis from Guntur District in Andhra Pradesh and they are so delicious!

image

image

Fryums are a common addition to a meal to add toast texture to dals. First we prepare a thick paste and then take old saree material and lay out flat using rocks to hold down edges. Then, we spoon on dollops of paste to saree and let dry in sun. Remove at night and then lay out again next morning until completely sun dried, about 1 week. If cracking too much the paste was not thick enough.
Pastes can be made with anytuing from chickpea flour to rice flour. Many fvorites are potato flour and tapioca flour. You will want to take 1 liter of water and bring to a boil add ground green chillis, and 4 Tablespoons of whole cumin seed and 5 to 10 tablespoons of salt. Fryums are usually very salty, so salt to taste. Once boiling add flour of choice (rice, corn, jowar, millet or ragi, besan or potato flour) Bring mixture to a boil and watch it thicken. you want it to be thick like molassas but still runny. Finish by putting on saree and setting out in sun. Do not turn or mess with them. As you see below we have put a plastic cover over them that is transparent, we do this only to keep flys or dirt from landing on them, as India is very dusty.

image

image

To make Fryums we heat up 5 tbs oil for several minutes, then we place a few of them in oil and jiggle a little, once puffy flip and repeat. should only take 1 minute for them to fry up. Serve with dal and a vegetable curry! Enjoy!

Jenna’s Vegetable Raita

I have been trying to adapt myself to a whole new World of vegetables and fruits here in India that I am not too familiar with. I have found that here in South India rice is a staple food, and quite frankly that doesn’t work for my body for some reason. I gain massive amounts of weight and I don’t want that anymore than the next person. So, I have been trying to work with ingredients and find new ways to eat healthier. This following recipe is a favorite of mine because it has lots of veggies and its very good with dosa, chapathi, parota, roti, naan you name it. I just don’t eat with rice often.

2 small very ripe red tomatoes diced

2 stalks of green onion/spring onion chopped

1/2 cup of dry roasted peanuts (no fat added or salt)

2 green bell peppers/capsicum 1 diced and 1 sliced into strips to dip with

4 carrots: 1 carrot diced thin and 1 sliced into strips to dip with.

Optional: 1/4 cup cabbage; some kind of roti or Indian bread; the veggie sticks I always eat because we could all use more veggies!

2 cups of Indian Curd or Greek Yogurt

1 tsp salt

a dash of black pepper

Combine all ingredients diced together, salt and pepper, curd/yogurt well.

Ready to eat with Bell Pepper & Carrot strips on top of cabbage

Total Cooking Time: 15 minutes

Avakaya Mango (Hot Mango) Pickle- Andhra Style

Avakaya Mango (Hot Mango) Pickle- Andhra Style
Pick mangoes that are green and sour. Clean mangoes before cutting and dry with cotton cloth. Clean mangoes after cutting and dry well with another cotton cloth. MAKE SURE DRY!! Indian pickles are used as a condiment with anything you want. Once the pickle is ready the whole pieces can be eaten. Beware!! Eating too much pickle can cause heat in your body and can give you boils on your skin and terrible motions.

This is a easy way to prepare mango pickle in Andhra style. Take a bowl for measurement and measure all the ingredients with the same bowl and the pickle can be made very easily.

Ingredients:

6 bowls of chopped mangoes (approx 10 medium size mangoes)
1 bowl of mustard powder (finely ground)
1 bowl of salt
1 bowl of Red chilli powder
2 table spoons of haldi (Turmeric)
1/2 bowl of garlic minced
2 tablespoons of methi (fenugreek)
2 tablespoons of methi Powder (roasted dry and powdered Fenugreek)
3/4 ltr. Gingely oil (sesame oil)

Mix all the ingredients (Chilli powder,haldi,methi powder, garlic mashed and garlic minced, methi and salt) except oil in a large vessel. (Remember the vessel should be dry) Put the mango pieces and mix well. Pour half of the oil and mix well. Put the mixture into a air tight container or a jar and pour the remaining oil over it. Leave it for 3 days.

After three days mix the pickle well with a dry spoon and pour oil if necessary. Taste the pickle if salt is less add little salt.(if salt and oil are not enough the pickle may get spoiled soon.)

Tip: Remember the oil should be half inch above the pickle. Keep in a dry, cool, airtight container up to one year keep the oil and salt from evaporation.DSC03683

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Dondakaya Fry

dondakaya fry

Dondakaya Fry

This is a traditional recipe that my Atthayya (Mother-In-Law) has taught me. It is traditional in Andhra Pradesh where my Husband’s family is from. Dondakaya is a gourd from the ivy gourd. It is also called Tindora/Tindoora. A good substitute is fresh gherkins. This is so easy yet so tasty! Ireally like the crispiness that my Atthayya gets and she salts them quite a bit as they make the dish taste more like a fresh pickle. Most of Andhran food is eaten with rice unless I specify otherwise and since this is a fry we normally eat this with Rasaam or Dal

1/2 kg (1pound) of fresh Dondakaya cut into rounds
1/2 TBS Red Chili Powder (I prefer to take dried red chili and grind it up into a powder, then add dried garlic cloves with skin on into the powder and store no longer than four months)
3 1/2 TBS Salt
3 Cups water
1 TBS oil

Soak the dondakaya in a brine mixture of the salt and water for 1-2 hours or even overnight in fridge but use less salt if so. Drain and get as much water off of them. In a pan heat oil and then add the dondakaya with the salt and chili powder. Fry the rounds stirring every minute or so for 10-15 minutes until dark brown and crispy.

Other variations: add peanuts (groundnuts) and split yellow lentils into 2 TBS oil and fry for 3-5 minutes until the nuts and lentils are just slightly light brown then add dondakaya, salt and chili powder.

Fried Gram Chutney Recipe

Most Americans do not know what fried gram is and will have difficulty finding exactly what they need in a regular store. That is why I always suggest going to ethnic markets. You can also buy online and get better deals and save some time. You can either buy roasted/fried gram/dal or make it yourself in a hot wok with no oil and do not make them brown or black. I have been looking for a vendor in USA for them online with zero luck, so if anyone has any info on that please email me.

In South India, finding roasted/fried gram/dal is very easy. This recipe is not a traditional one in my household and the reason I included it was because chutney’s are very important in India. We use them with many different fried foods and breads. My favorite dip to this chutney is bonda/mysore buji balls (please excuse my Hindi as I rarely use it as Telugu is the language more common to me in Hyder)

Fried Gram Chutney

1/2 of a coconut grated
curry leaves 5-8
fried gram- 50 g
5 Green chilies
1 tbsp mustard seeds
1 tbsp oil
salt to taste
10 g of tamarind

Directions:
Grinding: together grated coconut,fried gram,green chillies,tamarind and salt into a fine paste.
Tempering: heat oil in a pan. add mustard seeds.when they splutter, add curry leaves.pour the chutney paste into it and stir well. remove from fire.
Serve with masala dosas,idlis or chapatis.

Indian Cooking Basic Supplies

Living in India I am learning a lot of new things. I have always considered myself a good cook, but now I am forced into eating, preparing and learning new ways for my family. Here are some of my favorite recipes and tips on cooking Indian dishes authentically. Please feel free to comment and request dishes or techniques used you would like explained in more detail. As many of you know Blogger is LAME but its where my stuff is, so…I post all my recipes as comments. Thanks for your patience!

Firstly, a few things that are needed to make an Indian Kitchen run well:

Pressure Cooker- The pressure cooker is the life of our kitchen and tummies. We depend on it for everything as most Indians do NOT have a western stove or oven. Some don’t even have a microwave. Gas is provided a bit differently here so a gas stove is a hard to come by product. So, learning that a pressure cooker is a great way to cook will make your Indian cooking go much smoother. And for those who are afraid it will blow up….come on now we live in the 21st Century!!
Deep Pots and flat pans (called dosa pans)– Deep pots like a stock pot with a thick bottom and pancake pans are ideal. Must have to cook our favorite dishes.
Insulated container for curd to maintain 85-90 deg for 8 hours
Food Products Needed In Pantry
I suggest that when using powder you grind it from the whole spice itself. It is fresher that way!!
dried coriander seed (powder & whole)
whole cinnamon bark
whole cloves
fenugreek seeds
dried star anise with pods
cumin/jeera (powder and whole)
black mustard seed
turmeric powder
red chili powder
whole dried red chillies 
dried tamarind 
asafoetida/hing powder (never use in dishes without cooking it or get runs)
sesame seeds
dried coconut
coconut oil 
peanut oil, sunflower oil
saffron
whole cloves at least 1 large one on hand
onions- everything has onions in it
split lentils- red & yellow (be careful of eating too many red ones bad for liver)
salt (iodized and rock salt)
fresh or dried curry leafs/karivepaaku- (curry tree seeds are poisonous)
dried bengal gram/cici beans/garbonzo beans/chickpeas/chana
dried green gram/mung beans
dried black gram/urad dal/black lentil
rava/semolina coarse ground
white rice short grain
basmati rice
ghee
raw peanuts/ground nuts whole
fried gram/roasted bengal gram

If in USA please stay tuned as I will provide websites and markets for those who need to find these items. For now look for your local Indian Market (usually coupled with Pakistani Markets or Filipino Markets)
If I add anything to this list after it is updated I will put in different colors and post the date of the changes in this post.